Common arrhythmias in patients with syncope

November 22, 2022

1 minute read

Source/Disclosures

Source:

Hoppe BL, et al. Abstract MO4131. Presented at American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; November 5-7, 2022; Chicago (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures:
Hoppe reports financial ties to iRhythm Technologies.


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CHICAGO — Among patients with a history of syncope who had outpatient ECG monitoring, nearly four in five had an arrhythmia, researchers reported at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

“Patients with a history of syncope are at high risk of sudden death, with a 1-year mortality rate of 30%,” Bobbi Lynne Hoppe, MD, FACC, FHRS, electrophysiologist from Kittitas Valley Healthcare in Ellensburg, Washington, and colleagues wrote in an abstract. “Timely triaging of relevant arrhythmias in this population is critical to enable potentially life-saving interventions.”

Graphical representation of the data presented in the article

Data are from Hoppe BL, et al. Abstract MO4131. Presented at American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; November 5-7, 2022; Chicago (hybrid meeting).

Hoppe and colleagues conducted a retrospective analysis of 10,643 US patients (mean age, 65 years; 49% female) with a history of syncope and an indication for surveillance. All patients had recordings with an ambulatory ECG monitoring system (Zio AT, iRhythm Technologies) for an average of 11.9 days between July 2017 and December 2021.

Among the cohort, 79% had at least one arrhythmia detected and 29% had at least two types of arrhythmia detected, according to the researchers.

The most common types of arrhythmia were supraventricular tachycardia (69%), ventricular tachycardia (26%) and atrial fibrillation (9.5%), Hoppe and colleagues found.

The atrioventricular block rate was 3.6% and the pause rate was 6.2%, according to the researchers.

AF/atrial flutter was the most common type of arrhythmia to trigger a notification alert (8.5%), whereas in those with AF, the mean time to first AF detection was 1. 4 days, and in those with paroxysmal AF, the average time to first detection was 2.8 days, Hoppe and colleagues found.

“In this large retrospective study, ambulatory ECG monitoring with Zio AT in patients with syncope revealed a surprisingly high incidence of AF and supraventricular tachycardia,” Hoppe and colleagues wrote in the abstract. “Further analysis of this group may help clinicians focus on increasing awareness of atrial arrhythmias in this population.”